Is weed legal in Tennessee?

Is weed legal in Tennessee

Is weed legal in Tennessee? The short answer is no, unfortunately. While some states have made strides in legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes, Tennessee has not yet followed suit, while the law isn’t currently on the side of weed smokers in Tennessee.

Marijuana Possession in Tennessee

Possession of between half an ounce and ten pounds is a felony offense punishable by up to six years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Finally, possession of more than ten pounds is considered drug trafficking, which carries much harsher penalties, including up to 60 years in prison and a $200,000 fine.

While it’s technically possible to receive the maximum sentence for marijuana possession in Tennessee, it’s important to keep in mind that prosecutors have discretion when it comes to charging offenders. In many cases, first-time offenders will be offered a plea deal that results in reduced charges or a lighter sentence.

The Future of Marijuana in Tennessee

While marijuana is currently illegal in Tennessee, there is a growing movement to change that. A bill to decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis has been introduced in the state legislature, and it has received support from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. In addition, several cities in Tennessee have passed resolutions asking the state to legalize marijuana. It’s clear that public opinion is shifting on this issue, and it’s possible that Tennessee will eventually join the growing list of states where marijuana is legal.

Tennessee’s Cannabis Timeline

1914- The first recorded mention of cannabis in Tennessee occurred in the Memphis Medical Journal and was titled “The New South’s Newest Menace: Marijuana.”

1937- The Tennessee General Assembly passed the first state law in the nation making marijuana possession a crime punished for 12 years in prison.

1970- The Governor’s Commission on Crime and Delinquency report recommended decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal use. The recommendation was not acted upon.

1974- Possession of less than one ounce of marijuana was made a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum fine of $100 and/or up to 60 days in jail. First offenders were eligible for probation.

1976- The legislature reduced penalties for first and second offense possession of marijuana to a fine not to exceed $100 and/or imprisonment not to exceed 30 days. A third offense was still a felony. First offenders were again eligible for probation.

1990- The Tennessee General Assembly passed a law making it a crime to possess, sell, manufacture, or deliver drug paraphernalia, including pipes used for smoking marijuana. The law carried a maximum penalty of one year in jail and/or a $2,500 fine.

1996- Governor Don Sundquist signed into law legislation reducing the penalty for possession of small amounts of weed from a misdemeanor to a civil violation punishable by a maximum fine of $50 with no possibility of jail time. The legislation also established a drug-free school zone around schools, daycare centers, and parks where enhanced penalties could be imposed for drug offenses.

2001- Governor Sundquist signed legislation making it a crime to operate a motor vehicle while impaired by any controlled substance, including marijuana. The law provided for license revocation for up to one year upon conviction.

2005- The legislature passed a law making it a crime to use or possess drug paraphernalia, including pipes used for smoking marijuana, with the intent to manufacture, sell, deliver, or possess a controlled substance. The maximum penalty for the offense is one year in jail and/or a $2,500 fine.

2010- Governor Bredesen signed legislation making it a felony offense to sell, manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to sell or deliver 0.5 ounces or more of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school zone. The maximum penalty for the offense is 15 years in prison and/or a $200,000 fine.

2014- The legislature passed a law making it a felony offense to sell, manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to sell or deliver 0.5 ounces or more of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school zone. The maximum penalty for the offense is 15 years in prison and/or a $200,000 fine.” Neither Sundquist signed legislation making it a crime to operate a motor vehicle while impaired by any controlled substance, including marijuana. The law provided for license revocation for up to one year upon conviction.

2022 – This is when recreational cannabis is projected to be legalized in Tennessee!

When that was a close one! For a while there, it looked like Tennessee might not legalize weed until 2023, but thanks to some last-minute legislative maneuvering, we should be able to light up recreationally by the end of 2022. So please mark your calendars and start stocking up on snacks because it’s going to be a party!

TBI’s Testing Process

requirements and expectations

The use of marijuana is still illegal in Tennessee; however, the state has a very specific process for testing drivers for drug use. The following is an overview of what you can expect if you are pulled over and asked to submit to a drug test.

Currently, there is no legal limit for detectable THC in a driver’s system in the state of Tennessee. This means that any amount of the drug found in your system could result in a DUI charge. However, the state does require that all drivers submit to a blood test if they are suspected of driving license.

If you decide to take the test, you will lose your license for one year.

conclusion

Currently, it is illegal to possess, sell, or cultivate marijuana in Tennessee. Possessing small amounts of marijuana can result in a misdemeanor charge and possible jail time while selling or cultivating larger amounts can lead to felony charges and significant prison time. Driving while under the influence of

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